Author Archives: Mike Munter

Nick Oberheiden 2


Autocomplete Proposal


Note: This page is set to noindex. It will not be found anywhere on the web. 

Objective: Displace negative suggestion(s) shown below from Autocomplete in Google.com for keyword: Nick Oberheiden

Agreement: We guarantee to push out each of the negative suggestions shown above. If we do not push out the negative suggestions, you owe nothing and we issue a full refund.

Normally, our solution works for 3 months and oftentimes much longer. But we don’t control Google’s algorithm or customer search patterns, so it’s impossible to guarantee how long the negative(s) suggestions will be gone.

Maintenance: If the negative suggestion(s) reappear, you can do maintenance as needed. Price for maintenance will likely be discounted 20-40% off your initial price below. Firm maintenance cost will be quoted at the time of each renewal period.

Cost: $3,300. We charge your credit card in advance and issue a full refund if we are not successful in meeting the objective. This is a guaranteed service. It is currently taking about 45-90 days for us to push out the negative suggestions.

 

FIXED 7-29-2021

Terms to use per Gerrid-

Priority terms:
  1. Recent wins
  2. Litigation victories
  3. TV interviews
  4. VIP cases
  5. CEO defense
  6. Celebrity cases
  7. Top ratings
  8. White House cases
Secondary terms:
  1. Media expert
  2. Reviews
  3. National practice
  4. Notable cases
  5. Practice areas
  6. High ethics
  7. Litigation counsel
  8. Trial lawyer
  9. Testimonials
  10. Famous clients
  11. High profile lawyer
  12. Quotes
  13. Books

Nick Oberheiden – Autocomplete

Zoek Marketing

Note: This page is set to noindex. It will not be found anywhere on the web. 


Related Searches Proposal for Keyword: Zoek Marketing


Objective: Displace negative suggestion(s) shown below from Related Searches in Google.com for keyword above

Cost: Please note this strategy is not guaranteed to fix the problem. We don’t control the search engines and algorithmic changes can cause our strategy to be ineffective.

  • $150 setup fee
  • $670 per month
  • You may cancel anytime with 7 days notice.
  • All payments made by VISA/MC

 

 


Screenshot Reports


Monthly screenshots will be provided below. Please bookmark this page for updates on the 28th of each month.

Zoek Marketing – Related searches

Smoothstack


Autocomplete Proposal


Note: This page is set to noindex. It will not be found anywhere on the web. 

Objective: Displace negative suggestion(s) shown below from Autocomplete in Google.com for keyword: Smoothstack

Agreement: We guarantee to push out each of the negative suggestions shown above. If we do not push out the negative suggestions, you owe nothing and we issue a full refund.

Normally, our solution works for 3 months and oftentimes much longer. But we don’t control Google’s algorithm or customer search patterns, so it’s impossible to guarantee how long the negative(s) suggestions will be gone.

Maintenance: If the negative suggestion(s) reappear, you can do maintenance as needed. Price for maintenance will likely be discounted 20-40% off your initial price below. Firm maintenance cost will be quoted at the time of each renewal period.

Cost: $4,500. We charge your credit card in advance and issue a full refund if we are not successful in meeting the objective. This is a guaranteed service. It is currently taking about 45-60 days for us to push out the negative suggestions.

ICT-guaranteed


Autocomplete Proposal


Note: This page is set to noindex. It will not be found anywhere on the web. 

Objective: Displace negative suggestion(s) shown below from Autocomplete in Google.com for keyword: International Cooling Tower

Agreement: We guarantee to push out each of the negative suggestions shown above within 90 days. If we do not push out the negative suggestions, you owe nothing.

Normally, our solution works for 3 months and oftentimes much longer. But we don’t control Google’s algorithm or customer search patterns, so it’s impossible to guarantee how long the negative(s) suggestions will be gone.

Maintenance: If the negative suggestion(s) reappear, you can do maintenance as needed. Price for maintenance will likely be discounted 20-40% off your initial price below. Firm maintenance cost will be quoted at the time of each renewal period.

Cost: If we are successful in pushing out the negative suggestions, you owe $3,700. We charge your credit card in advance for this service and issue a full refund if we are not successful in meeting the objective. It is currently taking about 45-60 days for us to push out the negative suggestions.

 


Screenshots


Monthly screenshots will be provided below. Please bookmark this page for updates on the 28th of each month.

Pat Mazza

Note: This page is set to noindex. It will not be found anywhere on the web. You’ll receive a monthly search activity and screenshot reports sent via email on the 1st of each month.


Autocomplete Proposal for Keyword: Pat Mazza


Objective: Displace negative suggestion(s) shown below from Autocomplete in Google.com for keyword above

 

Cost: Please note this strategy is not guaranteed to fix the problem. We don’t control the search engines and algorithmic changes can cause our strategy to be ineffective.

  • $150 setup fee
  • $525 per month
  • You may cancel anytime with 7 days notice.
  • All payments made by VISA/MC

 

 


Screenshot Reports


Pat Mazza – Autocomplete

Don’t Use Microworkers To Fix Your Google Autocomplete Problem

Microworkers is a crowdsource site that allows you to get tasks completed by workers all over the world. I’ve used it in the past to create search activity (similar to Mechanical Turk) to correct Google Autocomplete campaigns and it used to work beautifully.

But it doesn’t work anymore. In fact, crowdsource sites no longer work to fix problems with negative suggestions in Google.

Failed Autocomplete Campaign Using Microworkers

I know we’re not supposed to “out” other firms, but I want you to understand and see for yourself why Microworkers isn’t working and why YOU NEED TO ASK YOUR REPUTATION MANAGEMENT FIRM HOW THEY INTEND TO FIX YOUR AUTOCOMPLETE PROBLEM.

autocomplete campaigned failed using microworkers

I took the above screenshot April 22, 2016. Notice the negative “scam” appearing #1 and “corporation scam” appearing #6.

There were 500 jobs listed on Microworkers asking for people to search positive terms related to Vector Marketing. (This is typically how we try to push out negatives – by accumulating search activity around positive terms in hopes it will push out the negative suggestions).

I had a feeling it wouldn’t work because crowdsource sites like Microworkers, Mechanical Turk, Crowdflower and others leave an easy footprint Google can track. I believe that any searches made from these sites simply don’t count and this is why Autocomplete campaigns using these sites will fail over and over again.

vector marketing autocomplete campaign update july 2016

The screenshot above was taken July 7, 2016 and after 3 months, you can see that scam is still the #1 suggestion and now a new negative “scam reddit” has appeared #8.

We’ll have to check back in another 3 months, but thus far, the “scam” suggestion continues to hurt Vector Marketing and this campaign is failing. The reason is because whatever ORM firm setup this campaign used Microworkers to list it’s jobs.

I outline the reasons why crowdsource sites like Microworkers do not work in this 6 minute video:

Summary

No one can guarantee results with Google Autocomplete. The algorithm is simply changing too quickly: Google needs to protect the authenticity of the suggestions it provides.

But if you have a negative suggestion that is effecting your business, you need to hire us. We give you the BEST CHANCE to push out unwanted suggestions because we:

  1. Only use real people to perform searches
  2. We do not use crowdsource sites like Microworkers
  3. We do not use bots or proxies to try to simulate search activity
  4. We do everything we can to not leave a footprint Google can track

Our methods are explained here.

Before you hire anyone else to fix your Google, Bing, or Yahoo Autocomplete problem, you need to ask them: How are you creating natural looking search activity?

If they won’t tell you, can’t tell you, or skirt the question, move on. They don’t know what they’re doing.

Call me at 503-890-6663 for a quote.

6 Reasons Why Your Google Autocomplete Campaign Is Not Working

You may have noticed that manipulating Google Autocomplete is a lot harder than it used to be. In the “old days,” all you had to do was load your positive search terms into Mechanical Turk, wait for the algorithm to refresh and voila! You’re negative suggestions were gone and replaced with the new positive ones.

Reputation management firms like mine and others offered 100% guaranteed results and made a nice profit with very little personal time involved.

But all of that changed in July 2014. That’s when Google began tweaking its search suggestion algorithm to keep people like me from changing it so easily.

Over the last year, our case load dropped, along with our certainty of being able to clean up a client’s unwanted suggestions. Instead of a 100% success rate, we were only successful between 50-75% of the time.

In checking with other reputation management firms, they were experiencing the same problems. Some firms stopped offering the service, others referred their clients out, and other firms went to a “content+search activity” model that was a lot more expensive and only marginally more effective.

In the cases we were successful in fixing, I have to be honest: we didn’t always know what it was we were doing that was fixing the case, because we usually didn’t see our suggestions replacing the negative ones. A colleague and I theorized that simply “shaking the tree” was enough to get negative suggestions pushed out – even if the new suggestions weren’t the ones we were creating search activity for.

Success Again

But I recently saw that change.

In July 2015, for the first time in a year, we saw the exact terms we were searching appear as suggestions for our clients. It didn’t take long to discover that the clients who saw these changes were the clients whose keywords were being searched entirely by our private network of real people.

So, for now, at least, that’s the secret sauce.

If you want to change Google Autocomplete suggestions, build a private network of people and have them do the searches for you. Don’t spend a lot of time and money on content – search activity, in my opinion – has always trumped content as the factor which most influences the suggestions we see.

Having already spilled the beans on how to fix autocomplete, here are some reasons why your autocomplete campaign might not be working as you’d hoped.

Reasons (Theories) Why You Can’t Change Google Autocomplete

1) Too much search activity. Back in January of 2014 when Justin Bieber was arrested, within hours, we saw suggestions like mugshot, jail, prison, and arrest after his name in Google autocomplete. Within a week, the negative suggestions were gone as the story died down.

I’ve heard of the same thing happening to reputation management clients. In the haste to create a positive solution, the firm handling the account will spike search activity so high to try to get a quick result. And while they get the result, it doesn’t stick very long.

I feel the principle is the same as in the Justin Bieber case. If you want new keyword suggestions to remain visible over the long haul, you’ve got to ramp up search activity at levels that are reasonable to your keyword.

For most clients, the volume for their negative suggestion is low, <20 searches per month according to Google’s keyword planner. Doing 1,000 searches for a set of new keywords just isn’t going to stick.

2) You’re using overseas workers. Sites like Mechanical Turk and Microworkers let you setup a task and get them done for pennies. It’s cheaper to hire workers in Bangladesh then it is in the United States, so there’s higher profit in hiring overseas workers to create your searches.

It used to work. It doesn’t work reliably anymore. If you want to change Google.com, you’ve got to use American workers.

3) You (or your workers) are using proxies. Proxy switching services like HideMyAss used to be excellent for creating the search activity that changed Google autocomplete for three reasons:

  • I could hire overseas workers to perform the searches (costs less)
  • I could geo-target locations (great for clients with problems in local markets)
  • No consecutive searches on the same IP (looks more natural)

Proxy services used to work; they don’t anymore. In June of 2015, we completed a test case for a client using HideMyAss exclusively to try to push out unwanted suggestions his company had in two specific markets. It didn’t work and confirmed our prior research from June 2014.

And even though crowdsource sites like Mechanical Turk and Microworkers allow you to select US workers for your jobs, those sites don’t do a good job of screening who actually lives in the United States vs. who is using a US proxy. So, if your searches are being done by someone using a proxy, they might not count and your autocomplete campaign won’t be successful.

4) You’ve tripped a “consecutive search” filter. This is a theory, based on my experience and what I’ve seen. (Why else would our campaigns on crowdsource sites not work?)

Maybe Google has an algorithmic filter that says, “If we see 20 searches in a row from one computer, we’re going to mark that as suspicious and not count any more searches from him/her, for fear of possible manipulation.”

Google loves to fix things algorithmically, so this makes sense. It sees 20 consecutive searches (or 50 in a row or 100 in a day) and a filter is tripped. Those searches don’t count and no other searches from that computer count for [six months, one year, life].

This adds even more weight to why our campaigns running on MTurk and Microworkers are ineffective. You can imagine workers there doing search after search after search. It’s rhythm work and it’s easy. Do too many in a row, trip a filter, and you’re paying workers to do searches that don’t count.

This theory is further reinforced by the ineffectiveness of running autocomplete campaigns on one of the largest crowdsource platforms in the world – CrowdFlower. CrowdFlower has relationships with hundreds of small crowdsource and gaming sites, so that when your job is posted on CF, it gets farmed out to other sites to be completed.

You would think this diversity in workforce would yield better results, but I have one colleague who runs his jobs on CrowdFlower with mixed results. So, either the workers on all of these smaller sites are using proxies or their IPs have been blocked.

One thing is for certain: Something is going on that is causing autocomplete campaigns on public crowdsource sites to be less effective.

5) Suggestions are frozen. This is a theory, too, and its one I heard through the grapevine from a client.

I’ve seen a few cases where no matter what we do, the suggestions don’t change. We’re testing this theory on a client right now with our private network to see if we can get the suggestions to change. If they don’t, we’ll conclude that this particular client’s suggestions are frozen for some time period.

6) Suggestions are different in different markets. For companies with multiple offices and lots of search volume, it’s common for Google to show different suggestions in different markets. A client with a problem in Houston is not going to get fixed unless people in Houston make the searches. While you might get lucky and see changes based on sheer volume, it’s unlikely that you’ll be successful.

Microworkers lets you target workers at the state level, but it’s hard to accumulate volume and impossible to know if your specific DMA is being hit with search activity (ie, you target California hoping to hit Los Angeles, but workers are spread out across the state, so it’s hard to get the needed volume in the Los Angeles DMA). Proxies allow you to target certain citites, but most proxies don’t work anymore.

We fixed a client once who had a problem ONLY in Minneapolis. In order to fix it, we had to run ads on Craigslist to find the people to do the work. It was a management nightmare and cost a lot of money per search. In the end, we were successful, but didn’t make any money on the campaign due to the high costs of running such a city-specific campaign.

Trying to change suggestions for a client in a specific city is possible, but much more expensive due to the high costs of recruiting the market and paying the workers.

If you have problems in a market that aren’t being fixed, it’s probably because you aren’t getting enough search activity from people on real computers who actually live in that market.

Conclusion

I could’ve titled this article, “6 Reasons Why You Should Create A Private Network To Fix Google Autocomplete Campaigns” because at the end of the day, that’s what it’s all about.

I’m convinced that having a private network to create search activity is still the best way to effect the suggestions in Google Autocomplete.

There are many positives to creating your own private network, such as:

  • You know workers are US-based
  • You have some control over the # of searches per day
  • Workers most likely not using proxies

Of course the biggest positive is right now we’re relying on the private network to fix the majority of our cases and we’re having more success than we have had in the last 12 months.

While it’s still not a guaranteed solution, we’re feeling good about our chances as compared to using the traditional method of crowdsourcing and the expensive method of content development.

If you operate a reputation management firm and want to send your clients to us, we offer a whitelabel service you can package and price as you like. Good luck with your campaign!